Red House Farm

Boulder, Utah

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Spring Grain planting

Posted by scott brodie on April 20, 2010 at 1:02 PM Comments comments (7)

April 20,2010

Lots of activity on the Farm this week....Brynn, Ben, dave and Doren have been working down on the Lower Garden (Brock and Michelle's)getting the wheat and Barley planted.

Doren disked  and Scott dragged he ground, then Ben and Brynn hand-seeded about 1 1/2 acres with high-desert wheat (Wit Wolkering).  This is an heirloom wheat that Brynn located out of California that seems promising.  It has never been grown in this area (as far as we know) and is known as being good for bread making.  we will also use it as chicken feed and if it works out, will save alot so other folks here can plant it in the future.  The 1/2+ acre we planted in Goldeneye Barley, will be used primarily for chicken feed and maybe some beer-making.  We are also just curious how Barley will grow here. By the way, the soil looks Excellent- loamy and dark, unlike alot of the soils around Boulder.  Not many weeds either!

We met with Eric Feiler and Loch Wade who will be working on getting the Combines in top shape for July's harvest- pretty exciting stuff!

We also disked over 1/2 acre in the Lower garden which will be our primary veggie garden- mostly food for this years CSA.  Brynn is waiting to plant as it is still a bit cold for veggies down here on the creek. 

The big job was getting all the irrigation handlines in place.....we went over them and fixed leaks, attached connections for hoses etc. This is where Dave's help was much appreciated (he helped us on his days off)  It looks like a most professional job- even Doren was impressed.

The Photo below is Brynn tilling house garden with new treehouse in background....to see photos of the grain, see our photo album titled 'grain planting'


.

Latest update April 5, 2010

Posted by scott brodie on April 5, 2010 at 4:43 PM Comments comments (2)

Wow, alot has been going on lately at the farm, this bein spring, and all....

The projects have started and continue.  In the building department, we have completed the siding on the kids clubhouse (almost) and built the swinging bridge into the clubhouse.  Dr Dave is putting the finishing touches on the treehouse...all that is left to do is build the hatch and erect the firepole exit (that is, unless, Ben builds the solar-powered hot tub beneath it)....should be a very kid-friendly zone!

On the Barn, we have finished the Loft and added a cocktail-friendly deck that should accomodate  about 10 thirsty farmers at days end.  We have almost finished the outdoor kitchen under the north side of the barn where we will cook our communal lunches and be able to host food-friendly gatherings. We also added some much-needed storage in the barn rafters where we will keep stuff like containers and boxes that take up alot of space but still need to be protected from the elements.  Ben and scott sided the west side of the barn so now we have only the east side to finish.

Dave did an amazing job tackling the deconstruction of the basement furnace and duct system.  Definitely a dirty job, but done with a smile.  Evan the WOOFER helped haul out the nasty stuff.


Scott and Peg Smith just finished working on a Grant  from Utah Arts and Humanities to host an art program at the farm featuring the amazing Billy and Grace. The program will be for kids of all ages (including adults!)  It would start the middle of summer.  Keep your fingers crossed...

Brynn just released 4 new colonies of bees into our recently acquired hives (for a total of 6 hives).  the weather was windy, but it seems that the little fellers are adjusting just fine to there new home here in the high desert.  Some bees will be located on the northwest corner of the house gardens and others will be on the lower garden.  The older hives are down by the creek.  If you are an allergic type, please bee aware that the farm is buzzin.

Scott and Ben are working on what was going to be a portable shade structure for the chickens, but after some consideration, we think it is going to be a storage shed.  It is a prototype for a moveable structure that could have many uses including a hoop house.

Brynn has been busy getting seeds, planning the new layouts for the gardens and planting program, building the soil with our compost and manure and a million other spring-type chores.  she has also been sniffing around for summer interns on the ATTRA and WOOFER websites....looks like we will have a solid crew for the summer!   Crista Beerling will be joining us from Flagstaff when she graduates from college in May.  Dave will stay on for the summer and be helping out with the chickens.  Ben landed here a couple of weeks ago from Montana via Durango and is fitting in well with his positive attitude and sense of humor.  Evan was with us for a week as a WOOFER and was hard-working and is now at a goat farm in Arizona.  Katherine just moved out to prepare for her summer graduate program in Flagstaff...she was a wonderful winter addition to the farm and helped out hugely when she wasn't teaching at the Boulder school. It looks like our old farmer-friend, Tom, from teton Valley will be joining us during planting season in early may as will be a couple from the Pacific Northwest.  Long-lost friend Seth (last sighting Dead show Sacramento 1989) may even show up in May.  He has been doing urban organic gardens near boulder, Colorado.

Brynn and Constance will be doing garden tours this summer as well as developing the seed-saving program...stay tuned for details...

Looks like we will be doing a self-service market stand for excess veggies as well as eggs...the Boulder Town Council has given us the go-ahead.   It will be located at the solar smoothie shak /tiki bar where we sold eggs last summer.

That is all for now, however, I know I left out many goings-on  including all the wonderful local folks that have been showing up and helping out....remember...we always have eggs for sale so stop by and check out the new community workshop....Scott



Latest update April 5, 2010

Posted by scott brodie on April 5, 2010 at 4:43 PM Comments comments (0)

Wow, alot has been going on lately at the farm, this bein spring, and all....

The projects have started and continue.  In the building department, we have completed the siding on the kids clubhouse (almost) and built the swinging bridge into the clubhouse.  Dr Dave is putting the finishing touches on the treehouse...all that is left to do is build the hatch and erect the firepole exit (that is, unless, Ben builds the solar-powered hot tub beneath it)....should be a very kid-friendly zone!

On the Barn, we have finished the Loft and added a cocktail-friendly deck that should accomodate  about 10 thirsty farmers at days end.  We have almost finished the outdoor kitchen under the north side of the barn where we will cook our communal lunches and be able to host food-friendly gatherings. We also added some much-needed storage in the barn rafters where we will keep stuff like containers and boxes that take up alot of space but still need to be protected from the elements.  Ben and scott sided the west side of the barn so now we have only the east side to finish.

Dave did an amazing job tackling the deconstruction of the basement furnace and duct system.  Definitely a dirty job, but done with a smile.  Evan the WOOFER helped haul out the nasty stuff.


Scott and Peg Smith just finished working on a Grant  from Utah Arts and Humanities to host an art program at the farm featuring the amazing Billy and Grace. The program will be for kids of all ages (including adults!)  It would start the middle of summer.  Keep your fingers crossed...

Brynn just released 4 new colonies of bees into our recently acquired hives (for a total of 6 hives).  the weather was windy, but it seems that the little fellers are adjusting just fine to there new home here in the high desert.  Some bees will be located on the northwest corner of the house gardens and others will be on the lower garden.  The older hives are down by the creek.  If you are an allergic type, please bee aware that the farm is buzzin.

Scott and Ben are working on what was going to be a portable shade structure for the chickens, but after some consideration, we think it is going to be a storage shed.  It is a prototype for a moveable structure that could have many uses including a hoop house.

Brynn has been busy getting seeds, planning the new layouts for the gardens and planting program, building the soil with our compost and manure and a million other spring-type chores.  she has also been sniffing around for summer interns on the ATTRA and WOOFER websites....looks like we will have a solid crew for the summer!   Crista Beerling will be joining us from Flagstaff when she graduates from college in May.  Dave will stay on for the summer and be helping out with the chickens.  Ben landed here a couple of weeks ago from Montana via Durango and is fitting in well with his positive attitude and sense of humor.  Evan was with us for a week as a WOOFER and was hard-working and is now at a goat farm in Arizona.  Katherine just moved out to prepare for her summer graduate program in Flagstaff...she was a wonderful winter addition to the farm and helped out hugely when she wasn't teaching at the Boulder school. It looks like our old farmer-friend, Tom, from teton Valley will be joining us during planting season in early may as will be a couple from the Pacific Northwest.  Long-lost friend Seth (last sighting Dead show Sacramento 1989) may even show up in May.  He has been doing urban organic gardens near boulder, Colorado.

Brynn and Constance will be doing garden tours this summer as well as developing the seed-saving program...stay tuned for details...

Looks like we will be doing a self-service market stand for excess veggies as well as eggs...the Boulder Town Council has given us the go-ahead.   It will be located at the solar smoothie shak /tiki bar where we sold eggs last summer.

That is all for now, however, I know I left out many goings-on  including all the wonderful local folks that have been showing up and helping out....remember...we always have eggs for sale so stop by and check out the new community workshop....Scott



RHF CSA newsletter #10 2-23-10

Posted by scott brodie on March 3, 2010 at 8:18 PM Comments comments (0)

              RED HOUSE FARM

                                           CSA #10   February 23, 2010   

 

Greetings members!

    It’s the last pick-up day of our CSA. Thanks for sticking with us! I hope you all

 feel it was worthwhile. It was certainly a positive adventure for us and we sure learned a lot.

 The root cellar is emptied of most vegetables, the vestiges of last season. Spring’s

 around the corner. It’s time to look ahead. 2010 feels like it’s going to be really good!

 

    Thanks to those of you who have returned your surveys. I believe that so far we

have received six. The comments are quite helpful. We’ll pass the results to you when we

have gotten them all back.  We think that we are going to stay with the same number of memberships for the Winter 2010 CSA.  We will give this years members first preference.  If you decide that you want to do it again, let us know sometime this summer.  Of course, we will change it a bit to reflect the results of the survey (fewer rutabagas, more potatoes etc)

 

    Other end of season notes :

We’re seeing some spoilage with our remaining squash. If you have not used all of yours keep a close eye on them. I have begun to cook and freeze some to tide me over until next fall. You may want to do the same. I ordered seed for long-storing varieties for this year.

Please do not forget to return mason jars to us!

Remember that we have eggs for sale. The girls are providing about three dozen a day. Until the weather gets warmer, they will be in the black fridge in the sunroom.

The Ground Beef comes from a beautiful cow that Doren Lyman raised on Alfred and Connie Jepsens pasture in Lower Boulder.  We split the beef with the Feilers and have been most enjoying it…hope you do too.

 

    Goodies in this  box:

    •    Boulder Beef! Try it in my favorite meatloaf recipe, following.

    •    Garden Tomatoes

    •    Inchelium Red Garlic

    •    Red Dragon and Red Core Chantenay Carrots

    •    Russett Potatoes

    •    Chioggia and Cylindra Beets

    •    Harris Model Parsnips

    •    Turnips and Rutabagas

    •    Mint Vinegar – Good on nice cuts of meat

    •    Dozen Eggs  and Coupon for 2nd Dozen

    •    Freshly-ground Wheat

We’re very excited to try growing wheat this spring and fall for baking. With any luck we’ll be

offering Boulder-grown wheat this year.

Red House Farm will be hiring at least two interns for this growing season.  This is always a fun challenge and critical for us.  As always, feel free to stop by and get your hands dirty.

We are looking to expand our self-serve egg scene to include any extra veggies etc that we grow.  We have gotten a larger fridge for outside to hold this food.

Of course, we plan to be at the Boulders farmers market and possibly expand to the Escalante farmers market (which is also on Saturdays).

Look for our summer movies that we’ll be showing in the barn…let us know if you have suggestions for titles.

 

                     GREEK MEATLOAF

1 ½  lbs minced beef or veal               Parsley

1 ½ C soft breadcrumbs                       ½ C melted butter

    •    ½  red wine                                           5 hard boiled eggs

    •    ¼ cup water                                          11/2C tomato juice   

    •    1 medium onion                                   1 clove garlic              

    •    1 egg, well beaten                                1 t sugar

    •    salt and pepper

Mix meat, breadcrumbs, wine, water, onion, egg, salt, pepper, parsley, and 4 T butter. Spread the mixture thickly and evenly onto waxed paper to an oblong shape, and place the hard-boiled eggs in a line down the center. Fold the meat mixture over the eggs and shape into a roll. Put the meatloaf into a greased baking dish. Add the rest of the butter and bake in a 425  degree oven until golden brown. Boil for five minutes the tomato juice, ½  cup water, garlic, sugar, and more salt and pepper. Pour over the meatloaf and continue baking for a further 40 minutes in a slow oven {about 275 degrees} with mashed potatoes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

        

            

 

 


RHF CSA newsletter #7

Posted by scott brodie on March 3, 2010 at 8:17 PM Comments comments (0)

Greetings Everyone!

 

I hope you had a truly joyful holiday with friends and family.  We did!  We enjoyed the snow in Idaho and beach in Florida.  But it’s always good to return to Boulder.  I’m looking forward to two quiet months of research and planning.  We just dove in quickly last year, our first year.  Now we’ve had a season to test the soil, improve the buildings, acquire equipment, etc.  We have a year’s experience to build upon.

 

Three things I’d like to accomplish this year (among others):

Town Food Assessment – to understand what we consume and need vs. what we produce

Develop Seed Stock – so we have on hand seed specifically accustomed to Boulder

Build a greenhouse – for year-round greens

 

This week we’re excited to offer our own Boulder-grown Anasazi beans.  Beans are a wonderful staple.  They’re easy to grow, they add nitrogen to the soil, store well for years, and are so healthful and delicious.  How to process on a large scale is what we need to figure out, but we do plan on saving a lot to replant this year.

 

Please return the mason jar and lid.  Also your egg cartons & boxes.  Thanks!

 

This week’s offerings:

 

Anasazi Beans w/dried jalapeño

Onions (use these with the beans)

Morris Piper & Colorado Rose potatoes

Inchellium Red Garlic

Parsnips

Cylindra Beets

Red Core Chantenay Carrots

Turnips & Rutabegas

Butternut Rugosa Violina Squash

Red Dragon Carrots

Homemade Apple/Carrot Muffins

Dozen Eggs

Coupon for 2nd Dozen

 

 

Anasazi Beans

 

Per Tia & Don Montoya, who provided some of their Anasazis in June for us to plant:

 

Soak the beans overnight.  (Do not soak jalapeño.  Add to bean pot later w/ onion.)  Discard any floating debris, then drain.  Rinse and drain again.  Cover beans with a couple of inches of water, add a diced onion or two and jalapeño but NOT salt (yet) and cook until tender, about three hours.  (Be sure to check that the water doesn’t cook off before beans are done.)  Add salt to taste when beans are completely cooked.

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning Friday, January 29th from 12-3pm (pick-up day), Red House Farm will host a winter food market.  If successful, we’ll continue to do this on subsequent pick-up days.  Please come early so you can be a part of it.  This is open to the public and may include local food items such as fresh baked goods, dairy products, dried foods, honey, prepared foods, etc.  We hope to see you there!

 

Mark your calendars – the last three CSA pickups are:

 

    CSA #8 – Friday, Jan. 29

    CSA #9 – Friday, Feb. 12

    CSA # 10 – Friday, Feb. 26

 

 

******************************************************************************************************

 

Red House Farm

 

Coupon for one dozen eggs

 

Expires 1/22

 

 

******************************************************************************************************

Red House Farm

CSA Member Newsletter #7

 

 

 

 


RHF CSA #5 12-01-09

Posted by scott brodie on March 3, 2010 at 8:16 PM Comments comments (0)

Red House Farm CSA Pickup #5  12/1/09  

Well, here we are at the mid-point of our Winter CSA…and it sure feels like winter.  We have been adjusting  to the cold temps (minus 15 degrees on weds nite!).  The chickens have been staying closer to the coop with the snow  and have settled in to a regular 2 dozen/day laying regimen.  We now have plenty of eggs for everyone.  We let them into the house garden for 10 days to pick at seeds and frozen bugs.  We have been sprouting grain (oats, wheat) in buckets for them which they enjoyed for awhile but have since lost interest in.  The Draw hens still will not roost in the coop but prefer being  in the cold so are not laying.  We oriented the coop east/west to get the most solar gain and it is staying warm for the farm chickens.   We skied down to the creek and it seems our mountain lion has moved on.  The Bees have been tucked in for the winter with straw bales.

Scott and Dave have been working on finishing up the workshop under the watchful eye of Muckluk, the rooster, who has mysteriously lost a toe (frostbite?).

Katherine moved into the farmhouse for the winter and is helping with farm stuff  when she is not teaching at the Boulder school.  She worked on her cousins farm back in the old days and also has experience farming in Oregon and Morocco as a Peace Corps volunteer.  She will be putting together the next pickup or two while the Brodies are in Idaho.

The Special this week is Greens from the hoophouses!  This was a late season experiment.  They are incredibly tasty  but few……growing VERY slowly with the short days.  We harvested all the greens for this week so enjoy the last of them..  Next year we will start them earlier. We will be providing more sprouts in the future because greens are precious in the winter.

The onions are a bit soft….We cured them but they are not storage onions (we  picked the variety before we decided to do a  Winter CSA).  The firmer ones we have held back for a later pickup.

We bought a steer along with the Feilers from Doren Lyman and butchered it last week.  It is now hanging and we will cut and wrap it this weekend.  It had a happy life grazing in Alfred Jepsons pasture.  Look for some local beast in a future pickup….

Next Pickup will be WEDNESDAY  December 23rd- mark your calender.

Have a GREAT Holiday season and enjoy the food!!

 

 

This weeks Box:

Greens- baby kale, chard, spinach, misc.

Spanish Roja garlic

Hubbard squash

Eggs

Purple Top turnips

Kennebec potatoes

Onions

Joan rutabaga

Red Dragon carrots

Dried sage

Parsnips

Fresh thyme (see recipe)

Mixed beets

 

List of ingredients that are good with WINTER SQUASH:

Olive oil butter, brown butter, sunflower seed oil, fontina, gruyere,pecorino romano, parmesian, sage, rosemary, garlic, red pepper, chile, cumin, corriander, brown sugar, coconut milk, ginger, lime, lemongrass, curry, onions, radicchio, apple, quince

 

Turnip or Rutabaga Puree:

1 small russet, peeled

2 lbs turnips and/or rutabegas

2 medium leeks or onions, whites only, chopped

1 garlic clove, thinly sliced

salt and fresh-milled pepper

2 T cream or buttermilk

2 t chopped fresh thyme

2T butter

Chop potato and turnips same size.  If using rutabagas, chop them ½ size.  Put vegs, leeks or onion and garlic in pot with cold water just to cover.  Add ½ t salt and simmer, partially covered, until tender 15-20 minutes.  Drain, reserving liquid.  

Mash the veggies with fork for a rough-textured puree or pass them through a food mill.  Add 2T more cream or reserved broth to thin the puree.  Stir in butter and thyme and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Variation: stir in 1C grated Gruyere cheese

 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

Coupon good for one dozen red house farm eggs before 12/17/09

Eggs in Black fridge which is now in the south room in farmhouse

 

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

 

 

 


RHF CSA newsletter #4

Posted by scott brodie on March 3, 2010 at 8:15 PM Comments comments (0)

Red House Farm CSA #4

Happy Thanksgiving Everyone!  Living in Boulder, there is always so much to be thankful for….often an abundance of life, love, food, scenery and colorful characters.

 Steve and Cheryl have donated this weeks pickup to Kelly for the community Thanksgiving potluck..hope to see you there.

Brynn has spent the last week working with potatoes and onions….storing and curing. If you feel the need to dig potatoes, check in with Brynn.  We are learning that we need to figure out where everything goes….some things in the barn, others in the root cellar, basement, sunroom and even bedrooms!

The chickens have been roaming freely…sometimes too much and getting into stuff and laying eggs in mysterious places.  With the cold weather, egg production has dropped.  We have put a heat lamp on a timer in the coop for nighttime, but we are still getting just enough eggs to provide for the CSA.  If you come by to redeem your egg coupon, there is a chance there will not be eggs.  Please be patient while we figure this out. We may try to fence them in an enclosure so they are more contained and we get all the eggs.  We have also started to sprout grains for them as there is less forage available.  We moved our 12 chickens from the Draw to the farm and they seem happier. The rooster voted ‘most personality’ has to be ‘Muckluk’.  Not only the showiest but he seems to prefer people to poultry and we think he may be the reincarnate of elvis had he been a buddist.

 There is a local mountain lion that has killed several deer near the farm but he seems satisfied with venison and has not yet established a taste for poultry (or three-legged dogs).

This weeks Box:

*Inchellium Red Garlic

*Bucket of Taters- Russets (for baking) and Red Barbaras (seeds donated to the farm by Barbara Gardener)

*Spicy Pumpkin bread or muffins (recipe was in 1st CSA pickup)

*Turban Squash

*Onions

*Red Dragon and Red Core Chantenay Carrots

*Cylindra Beets

* 3# of Globe Top Turnips (see recipe for glazed turnips)

*Wild Chicken Eggs (coupon for 2nd dozen below)

 

This weeks’ recipe…………..

Glazed Turnips

Glazing is a simple method for tenderizing veggies while adding to their natural sweetness and concentrating their flavors.  It is also a great way to highlight a single vegetable and give it richness without much fat.  Makes 4 servings.

1 ½  pounds turnips peeled and halved or quartered

1 ½ tablespoons unsalted butter

1 ½ tablespoons maple syrup

¾ teaspoon coarse sea salt

Freshly milled black pepper

    •    Place turnips in sauté pan large enough to hold them comfortably in a single layer.  Add butter, maple syrup, salt, pepper to taste, and enough water to cover turnips halfway.  Turn heat on high and bring to boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, simmer for 10 minutes.

    •    Uncover, raise the heat,  and bring to boil.  Boil until the liquid has reduced to a shiny glaze and the turnips are tender.

…………………………………………………………………………………………

Good for one dozen red house farm eggs

Pickup in black fridge before dec 5th

compliments of those wild hens

 

************************************************************

 

 

 


RHF CSA #3 11-13-09

Posted by scott brodie on March 3, 2010 at 8:14 PM Comments comments (0)

Red House Farm CSA Pickup #3  Nov 13, 2009

 

Today’s Box Includes…….

~Spanish Roja Garlic

~Hopi Winter Squash

~Red Delicious Apples (from Boulder Pioneer Orchard- use in        Squash Bisque Recipe)

~Red Core Chantenay Carrots

~Red Dragon Carrots

~Russet Potatoes

~Broccoli Sprouts

~Onions

~Garlicy Cilantro or Parsley Pesto

~Parsnips

~Beets

~Free-Range Chicken Eggs

 

New additions to the box this week are Parsnips, Brynns homemade Pesto and Broccoli Sprouts.  These are one of the most nutritious of all sprouts and have been found to have incredible cancer fighting properties…so much so, that there is are forces that are trying to make them illegal.  For more info see http://www.naturalpedia.com/broccoli_sprouts.html

We found the Parsnips to be almost impossible to dig up in their entirety.  They are supposed to be very long (and not so woody).  I read after trying to dig them up that it is helpful to rototill  next to the row and THEN dig them up.Katherine Doren and Trisha helped dig and collect- Thank you! Doren remembers his mother Lillian cooking them when he was a kid.  He says they are an acquired taste.

Next week, expect some sweet baked goodies for the Holiday weekend!

Well, things are beginning to slow down for us at the Farm.  Except for potatoes, all the crops have been dug and packed in sand or sawdust for winter storage in our rebuilt root cellar,  Thanks to all who helped with this large project….Pete and Cookie, Jacquie and Dean, Dianne O, Farmhouse Dave, Katherine and Erika, our farmer-friend from Idaho. We now have a lot of food in storage for the Winter! Now that it has been put up, we know what we have….expect your share to increase in size, especially the carrots and beets and garlic.  We planted 1700 garlic cloves (and 200 shallots) recently.  Expect 2-3 heads from now on. This is a good baseline for the future.  For example, I now know that 800 row feet of carrots is ample for this sized CSA (unless the deer get to them first).  Also, mid-June is too late to plant Leeks in the lower garden.  We definitely are in the steep part of the learning curve, this being our first year.  Next year, I would like to have the ideal offering, for example, I am sure more onions and potatoes would be welcome to most of you. Also, fresh herbs and greens.  Is it better to get some things (like potatoes and garlic) occasionally, but in greater quantities? Let us know what you think.

Farm notes:  

We received our first shipment of tools yesterday as part of our upcoming Red House Farm Community Workshop and Toolshare.  There is another shipment coming soon and Scott and Dave have been working to get the workshop rebuilt.  Dave is living in the farmhouse and has been trading his construction talents and chicken-keeping skills for rent.

Genevieve and Cristina are moving on for the winter.  Cristina was an incredible help this summer working as a farm intern and writing our USDA solar energy grant.  She has been volunteering at the Boulder school this year (the kids love her) in return for rent at the farmhouse.

We did a cider-pressing this past week with Nethaniel and Chanda and procured about 9 gallons of amazing nectar.

We could really use plastic grocery bags at the farm…if you have some lying around and do not want them, please bring them to the next pickup.

 

Marjoram-Infused Winter Squash Bisque (serves 6)

One 3 ½ to 4 pound winter squash

2 tablespoons butter

1 medium onion- chopped

1 large apple- peeled, cored and chopped

3 cups chicken broth

1 tablespoon honey

1 teaspoon dried marjoram

¼ teaspoon white pepper

salt (optional)

½ cup half and half

toasted pumpkin seeds, fresh marjoram sprigs and ground pepper for garnish

    •    Preheat oven 400 degrees.  Cut squash in half and remove seeds.  Place cut side down on lightly-greased aluminum foil lined baking sheet. Bake 45 minutes or until squash pulp is tender.  Remove from oven, cool 20 minutes.  Scoop out squash pulp, discarding shell.  Measure 2 ¾ cups squash pulp, set aside.

    •    .Melt butter in large Dutch oven over medium heat.  Add onion and apple.  Saute 5-7 minutes or until tender.  Add honey, broth, marjoram and white pepper.  Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer covered for 20 minutes.  Stir squash pulp.

    •    Process squash mixture in batches in blender or food processor until smooth, stopping to scrape down sides.  Return mixture to Dutch oven.  Add salt, if desired.  Whisk in half and half and cook over medium-low heat, 3 to 4 minutes or until thoroughly heated.  Garnish with pumpkin seeds, marjoram and freshly- ground pepper.

 

 

 

………………………………………………………………

Good for one dozen red house farm eggs

Place coupon in black fridge

Pickup before  nov 21, 2009

……………………………………………………………………….

 

 


RHF CSA Newsletter #2 10-30-09

Posted by scott brodie on March 3, 2010 at 8:12 PM Comments comments (0)

RED HOUSE FARM CSA #2  10-30-09

 

Today’s Box Includes:

     Blue Hubbard Squash

      Red Core Chantenay Carrot

       Red Dragon Carrot

        Colorodo Rose Potato

         Gold Top Turnip

          Rutebega

           Leeks and/or Onion

            Eggs

             Braising Greens

              Brynn’s famous Basil Pinion Bread

 

The Red House Farm CSA  members are Todd Campbell, Steve and Cheryl Cox, Anselm Spring, Doren Lyman, Tom and Lauren Jerome sharing with Keith and Lisa, Allysia Angus sharing with Steve and Amber Hughes, Michelle and Brock LeBaron, Pete and Cookie, Curtis and Diane, Dennis and Caroline and Jacque and Dean….thank you all!

Here’s some ideas on what to do with some of the veggies…..

Mary Feiler says the best way to use turnips is to scallop them like you would potatoes (you can even add scalloped potatoes)

Our farmer-friend Erika says she peels and dices them, then layers in a casserole with other veggies, cheese and herbs.

Pearl, the dental hygienist at the Wayne county Clinic says a peeled and diced rutebega will make a beef stew wonderful. If anyone is heading to Bicknell, would you drop off some squash for Pearl?  She is a great person to talk to about gardens, animals and bees (also teeth!)

Cookie says she took last weeks root veggies, doused them in balsamic vinegar and roasted them for two hours…yum

E-mail or tell us your recipes so we can include them in future boxes…

This week the big push at the farm is to harvest all the veggies in the lower garden before the deer do!  Stop by anytime to help….we will harvest then pack them in sand in the root cellar…come by if you want to help and would like to learn how to store your veggies long-term at home!

The red house farm will be hosting the bee meeting and potluck Nov 4th at 6 pm…buzz on over

If you did not get a chance to see our recent movie on the sustainable food movement ‘fresh’ last week, it was really good…we have a copy here if you would like to borrow it.

Don’t forget to pick up your second dozen eggs later…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Good for one dozen eggs

coupon good for one dozen red house farm eggs courtesy of the hens.

Expires November 6th…leave coupon in Fridge

 

 

 


RHF CSA Newsletter #1 10-16-09

Posted by scott brodie on March 3, 2010 at 8:11 PM Comments comments (0)

Red House Farm CSA Pickup #1 Oct 16

 

 

Greetings and thanks for supporting local food production in Boulder!  

There was a great response to the CSA and unfortunately, there were more people interested than memberships available..if there is a time when you cannot pick up your share, let us know and we can donate it to someone else.  

Also, if there are items that you do not want, you can leave them on the trade table as well as pick up items on the table that you would like more of.  

We have included only one dozen eggs in the box, but use the coupon to get another dozen from the black fridge before the next pickup.  Pickups will be every other Friday.  Please return egg cartons and box at the next pickup.  Thanks.

Make sure to grab a PUMPKIN from the front lawn!  Some of these are real monsters….remember, lift with your legs.  These are Howden pumpkins- good keepers and eaters as well as Jack-O-Lanterns….check out this recipe for SPICY PUMPKIN BREAD…….

 

 

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Cook time 1 hr 30 min/ready in 1 hr 50 min

    * 5 cups all-purpose flour

    * 3 cups sugar

    * 1 cup packed brown sugar

    * 1 tablespoon baking soda

    * 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

    * 2 teaspoons ground nutmeg

    * 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cloves

    * 1 (29 ounce) can solid pack pumpkin

    * 1 cup vegetable oil

    * 4 eggs, lightly beaten

    * 1/2 teaspoon rum extract or vanilla extract

    * 2 cups coarsely chopped pecans

 

 

DIRECTIONS

 

   1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugars, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. In another bowl, combine the pumpkin, oil, eggs and extract; stir into the dry ingredients just until moistened. Fold in pecans.

   2. Pour into three greased 8-in. x 4-in. x 2-in. loaf pans. Bake at 325 degrees F for 1-1/2 hours or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing from pans to wire racks.

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There is a long tradition of cooperative food projects in Boulder….Donna Jean Wilson told me the story of how about 60 years ago, 10 families would each raise a cow.  Every month, a family would butchertheirs at Ivan Lyman’s place and everyone would share the cuts.  This was in the days before folks had freezers so a whole cow would be too much for any single family.  Red House Farm is trying to help foster that pioneer spirit of cooperation….Tell us ideas you have.

 

Brynn could use some help before and the day of the pickup…let her know if you want to help.

Remember, we will be showing “FRESH”,a new movie about sustainable agriculture this Saturday at 7:30 in the Barn…bring a warm blanket and a mug for hot chocolate!

We may be doing an apple cider pressing next week…we’ll let you know!

We just found out we were successful in a grant to create a community tool-share program....Red House Farm will provide the tools and workshop for folks that do not have their own…details to follow….

We were also successful in getting a USDA grant to help pay for a solar grid-intertie system….Your CSA will be partially powered by renewable energy!

 

 

Todays box includes:

Red Dragon Carrots

Red Core Chantenay Carrots

Morris Piper Potatoes

All Blue Potatoes

Champion Radish

Fordhook Acorn Squash

Chesnook Red Garlic

Howden Pumpkin

Mixed Greens…sorry, some bitter

Purple Top turnip

Joan Rutebega w/radishes

Assorted breed Free-range eggs from the girls

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CSA #1  This coupon good for 1 dozen eggs at Red House Farm

Expires Oct 25, 2009

Place coupon in money jar in black refrigerator

 

 

 

 



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